60 Minutes November 1

This weekend 60 Minutes looks into Syria, Lorna Jane and Tasmanian Devils.

Rescue from Syria

Ashley Dyball and Reece Harding. Both fine young Australians. Gifted sportsmen. From good families. Side by side on the front line against Islamic State in Syria. Just 3 months ago, Reece stood on a landmine, while out on patrol and died. Now his mother Michele, and Scott and Julia Dyball are on a mission to save Ashley. This Sunday, 60 Minutes travels with Michele, Scott and Julia as they make the perilous journey through northern Iraq, and cross the border into Syria searching for Ashley. Michele is revered as the mother of a martyr – a stark reminder for the Dyballs. Deeper they go into the war zone to find their son. It’s a journey of heartache and reunion, charged with emotion, fraught with danger, and finally uncertainty as the Dyballs ask their son to come home.

Reporter: Tara Brown Producers: Gareth Harvey, Ali Smith

Lorna Jane

Women are wearing their gym gear everywhere: to the shops, school pick-up, even out to lunch. And it’s all thanks to one woman, Lorna Jane. She has singlehandedly turned daggy leotards into what she calls “active wear”. It’s the look good, feel good concept. And Lorna Jane is looking and feeling very good. She has built an active wear empire along with her husband, “Bill the Butcher”. And they’ve just knocked back half a billion dollars for their business. But in recent months Lorna Jane’s been accused of discriminating against larger women, and fostering a bullying culture. Allison Langdon goes inside the active wear empire to find out the truth about Lorna Jane.

Reporter: Allison Langdon Producer: Stephen Taylor

 

The Little Devils

There’s a new, highly controversial plan, to save the Tasmanian Devil. The facial cancer which first developed 20 years ago, is so widespread that 90 per cent of devils are now gone. On mainland Australia, a network of zoos and wildlife parks has built up an insurance population and some want to release their Devils into the wild. They believe this top order predator will restore balance to the ecosystem. But the Devil is owned by Tasmania, and no one can do anything without the State Government’s green light. As Charles Wooley discovers, it has sparked a furious scientific debate – whether Tasmanian devil belongs to the Apple Isle, or to all Australians.

Reporter: Charles Wooley  Producer: Howard Sacre

 

 

 

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